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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016 Oct;25(10):1392-1401. Epub 2016 Jul 20.

The Cancer Epidemiology Descriptive Cohort Database: A Tool to Support Population-Based Interdisciplinary Research.

Author information

1
Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, NCI, NIH, Rockville, Maryland.
2
Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS), Stanford University, Stanford, California.
4
Westat, Rockville, Maryland.
5
Office of Epidemiology and Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, Maryland.
6
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, NCI, NIH, Rockville, Maryland. seminard@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We report on the establishment of a web-based Cancer Epidemiology Descriptive Cohort Database (CEDCD). The CEDCD's goals are to enhance awareness of resources, facilitate interdisciplinary research collaborations, and support existing cohorts for the study of cancer-related outcomes.

METHODS:

Comprehensive descriptive data were collected from large cohorts established to study cancer as primary outcome using a newly developed questionnaire. These included an inventory of baseline and follow-up data, biospecimens, genomics, policies, and protocols. Additional descriptive data extracted from publicly available sources were also collected. This information was entered in a searchable and publicly accessible database. We summarized the descriptive data across cohorts and reported the characteristics of this resource.

RESULTS:

As of December 2015, the CEDCD includes data from 46 cohorts representing more than 6.5 million individuals (29% ethnic/racial minorities). Overall, 78% of the cohorts have collected blood at least once, 57% at multiple time points, and 46% collected tissue samples. Genotyping has been performed by 67% of the cohorts, while 46% have performed whole-genome or exome sequencing in subsets of enrolled individuals. Information on medical conditions other than cancer has been collected in more than 50% of the cohorts. More than 600,000 incident cancer cases and more than 40,000 prevalent cases are reported, with 24 cancer sites represented.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CEDCD assembles detailed descriptive information on a large number of cancer cohorts in a searchable database.

IMPACT:

Information from the CEDCD may assist the interdisciplinary research community by facilitating identification of well-established population resources and large-scale collaborative and integrative research. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(10); 1392-401. ©2016 AACR.

PMID:
27439404
PMCID:
PMC5480970
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0412
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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