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J Travel Med. 2016 Jul 18;23(5). doi: 10.1093/jtm/taw046. Print 2016 May.

Association between Australian Hajj Pilgrims' awareness of MERS-CoV, and their compliance with preventive measures and exposure to camels.

Author information

1
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS), Australia, NSW.
2
School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
Ministry of Health, Abha, Saudi Arabia.
4
Health Informatics Department, Saudi Electronic University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
5
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
6
Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Sydney, Australia.
7
WHO Collaborating Centre for Mass Gatherings and High Consequence/High Visibility Events, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.

Abstract

Through a prospective cohort study the relationship between travellers' awareness of MERS-CoV, and compliance with preventive measures and exposure to camels was evaluated among Australian Hajj pilgrims who attended Hajj in 2015. Only 28% of Australian Hajj pilgrims were aware of MERS-CoV in Saudi Arabia. Those who were aware of MERS-CoV were more likely to receive recommended vaccines [odds ratio (OR) 3.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5-5.9, P < 0.01], but there was no significant difference in avoiding camels or their raw products during Hajj between those who were aware of MERS-CoV and those who were not (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 0.3-5.2, Pā€‰=ā€‰0.7). Hajj pilgrims' awareness is reflected in some of their practices but not in all.

KEYWORDS:

Camel; Hajj; Knowledge; MERS-CoV; Pilgrims; Saudi Arabia; Unpasteurized milk; attitude and practice (KAP)

PMID:
27432904
DOI:
10.1093/jtm/taw046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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