Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cardiovasc Revasc Med. 2016 Dec;17(8):510-514. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2016.06.001. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Association of elevated triglycerides and acute myocardial infarction in young Hispanics.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, 90033. Electronic address: gessilfie@gmail.com.
2
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, 90033.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have demonstrated that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in young patients (age <45years) is associated with a high prevalence of smoking, obesity, hyperlipidemia and single vessel coronary artery disease (CAD). Hispanics represent the largest growing ethnic minority in the United States, yet features of AMI in young Hispanics have not been described.

METHODS:

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for AMI at Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center and Keck Medical Center were studied. We compared young Hispanics (age<45, n=47) with older patients (Hispanics and non-Hispanics age ≥45, n=888) to identify unique features of AMI in young Hispanics. We also compared young Hispanics with young non-Hispanics (n=33) and older Hispanics (n=447) in regards to traditional CAD risk factors, laboratory values and in-hospital outcomes. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify variables independently associated with in-hospital mortality.

RESULTS:

Young Hispanics had higher triglyceride levels than young non-Hispanics and older patients (234.5±221.0mg/dL vs. 145.3±67.4mg/dL vs. 156±118.2mg/dL, p<0.0004); and higher triglyceride than older Hispanics (234.5±221.0 vs. 147.0±98.9mg/dL, p<0.02). Body mass index was independently associated with the logarithm (base10) of triglyceride levels (p<0.0001). Hispanic ethnicity and age<45years, however, were not independently associated with in-hospital mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Young Hispanics with AMI have higher triglyceride levels than young non-Hispanics and older Hispanics. The elevated triglyceride levels may be related to lifestyle changes experienced by a young immigrant population transitioning to life in the United States.

KEYWORDS:

Acute myocardial infarction; Coronary artery disease; Hispanic; Metabolic syndrome; Percutaneous coronary; Triglyceride

PMID:
27432210
DOI:
10.1016/j.carrev.2016.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center