Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Sep;24(9):1867-73. doi: 10.1002/oby.21570. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Changes in liking for sweet and fatty foods following weight loss in women are related to prop phenotype but not to diet.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.
2
Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Changes in perceived intensity and liking of tasted foods have not been studied during weight loss from dieting. These outcomes were examined during a 6-month lifestyle intervention in women who had been classified by sensitivity to the bitter taste marker, 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP), and then randomized to a low-fat or low-carbohydrate diet.

METHODS:

Sixty-nine women (BMI = 34.4 kg/m(2) ; age = 44.2 years) followed the low-fat diet (n = 31) or low-carbohydrate diet (n = 38). At baseline and at 3, and 6 months, they rated overall liking and intensity of attributes in strawberry milk and salad dressing varying in sucrose (0%, 15%, and 30% wt/vol) or fat (10%, 30%, 50% wt/vol) content, respectively.

RESULTS:

Perceived intensity of the attributes did not change. For all participants, the 15% and 30% sucrose milk samples were equally liked at baseline and 3 months, but by 6 months, the 15% sucrose sample was highest liked (P < 0.007). Also, the 50% fat sample was most liked at baseline and least liked by 6 months (P = 0.04), and this effect was most pronounced in the nontasters (P < 0.02). There were no effects of diet prescription on liking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Weight loss from dieting resulted in a hedonic shift for foods with lower sucrose and fat content.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01856660.

PMID:
27430708
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21570
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center