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EBioMedicine. 2016 Jun;8:72-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.04.030. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

Exosome Derived From Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Mediates MiR-181c Attenuating Burn-induced Excessive Inflammation.

Author information

1
Department of Burn & Plastic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital to PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China.
2
Department of Burn & Plastic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital to PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China. Electronic address: cjk304@126.com.
3
Department of Medical Administration, The First Affiliated Hospital to PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived exosomes have diverse functions in regulating wound healing and inflammation; however, the molecular mechanism of human umbilical cord MSC (hUCMSC)-derived exosomes in regulating burn-induced inflammation is not well understood. We found that burn injury significantly increased the inflammatory reaction of rats or macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), increased tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels and decreased IL-10 levels. hUCMSC-exosome administration successfully reversed this reaction. Further studies showed that miR-181c in the exosomes played a pivotal role in regulating inflammation. Compared to control hUCMSC-exosomes, hUCMSC-exosomes overexpressing miR-181c more effectively suppressed the TLR4 signaling pathway and alleviated inflammation in burned rats. Administration of miR-181c-expressing hUCMSC-exosomes or TLR4 knockdown significantly reduced LPS-induced TLR4 expression by macrophages and the inflammatory reaction. In summary, miR-181c expression in hUCMSC-exosomes reduces burn-induced inflammation by downregulating the TLR4 signaling pathway.

KEYWORDS:

Burn; Exosome; Inflammation; miR-181c

PMID:
27428420
PMCID:
PMC4919539
DOI:
10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.04.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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