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Am J Ind Med. 2016 Dec;59(12):1061-1069. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22632. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

The impact of non-fatal workplace injuries and illnesses on mortality.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
U.S. Social Security Administration, Office of Retirement and Disability Policy, Washington, District of Columbia.
3
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia.
4
Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little research has examined the relationship between non-fatal workplace injuries and illnesses, and long-term mortality.

METHODS:

We linked non-fatal injury cases reported to the New Mexico workers' compensation system for 1994-2000 with Social Security Administration data on individual earnings and mortality through 2014. We then derived sex-specific Kaplan-Meier curves to show time to death for workers with lost-time injuries (n = 36,377) and comparison workers (n = 70,951). We fit multivariable Cox survival models to estimate the hazard ratio separately for male and female workers with lost-time injuries.

RESULTS:

The estimated hazard ratio for lost-time injuries is 1.24 for women and 1.21 for men. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were 1.15, 1.35 and 1.15, 1.27, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Lost-time occupational injuries are associated with a substantially elevated mortality hazard. This implies an important formerly unmeasured cost of these injuries and a further reason to focus on preventing them. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:1061-1069, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Cox regression; all-cause mortality; occupational injury and illness

PMID:
27427538
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22632
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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