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Trends Cell Biol. 2016 Dec;26(12):918-933. doi: 10.1016/j.tcb.2016.06.005. Epub 2016 Jul 15.

Translation Initiation Factors: Reprogramming Protein Synthesis in Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
2
Lady Davis Institute, SMBD JGH, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
3
Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Lady Davis Institute, SMBD JGH, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, McGill University, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: ivan.topisirovic@mcgill.ca.
4
Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, McGill University, Quebec, Canada; The Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: jerry.pelletier@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

Control of mRNA translation plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression and is critical for cellular homeostasis. Dysregulation of translation initiation factors has been documented in several pathologies including cancer. Aberrant function of translation initiation factors leads to translation reprogramming that promotes proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In such context, understanding how altered levels (and presumably activity) of initiation factors can contribute to tumor initiation and/or maintenance is of major interest for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this review we provide an overview of translation initiation mechanisms and focus on recent findings describing the role of individual initiation factors and their aberrant activity in cancer.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; protein synthesis; translation; translation initiation; translational control

PMID:
27426745
DOI:
10.1016/j.tcb.2016.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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