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Cell Rep. 2016 Jul 26;16(4):994-1004. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.06.053. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Ionic Basis for Membrane Potential Resonance in Neurons of the Inferior Olive.

Author information

1
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Hiroshima 734-8551, Japan.
2
Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan.
3
Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan.
4
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.
5
Department of Cellular Neurobiology, Brain Research Institute, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8585, Japan.
6
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Hiroshima 734-8551, Japan. Electronic address: hashik@hiroshima-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Some neurons have the ability to enhance output voltage to input current with a preferred frequency, which is called resonance. Resonance is thought to be a basis for membrane potential oscillation. Although ion channels responsible for resonance have been reported, the precise mechanisms by which these channels work remain poorly understood. We have found that resonance is reduced but clearly present in the inferior olivary neurons of Cav3.1 T-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel knockout (KO) mice. The activation of Cav3.1 channels is strongly membrane potential dependent, but less frequency dependent. Residual resonance in Cav3.1 KO mice is abolished by a hyper-polarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker, ZD7288, and is partially suppressed by voltage-dependent K(+) channel blockers. Resonance is inhibited by ZD7288 in wild-type mice and impaired in HCN1 KO mice, suggesting that the HCN1 channel is essential for resonance. The ZD7288-sensitive current is nearly sinusoidal and strongly frequency dependent. These results suggest that Cav3.1 and HCN1 channels act as amplifying and resonating conductances, respectively.

PMID:
27425615
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.06.053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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