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Cortex. 2016 Sep;82:263-276. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2016.06.012. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

Trans-saccadic interactions in human parietal and occipital cortex during the retention and comparison of object orientation.

Author information

1
York Centre for Vision Research and Canadian Action and Perception Network, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
York Centre for Vision Research and Canadian Action and Perception Network, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Biology, Neuroscience Graduate Diploma Program and NSERC Brain in Action CREATE Program, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
York Centre for Vision Research and Canadian Action and Perception Network, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Biology, Neuroscience Graduate Diploma Program and NSERC Brain in Action CREATE Program, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Departments of Psychology, and Kinesiology and Health Sciences, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: jdc@yorku.ca.

Abstract

The cortical sites for the trans-saccadic storage and integration of visual object features are unknown. Here, we used a variant of fMRI-Adaptation where subjects fixated to the left or right of a briefly presented visual grating, maintained fixation or saccaded to the opposite side, then judged whether a re-presented grating had the same or different orientation. fMRI analysis revealed trans-saccadic interactions (different > same orientation) in a visual field-insensitive cluster within right supramarginal gyrus. This cluster was located at the anterolateral pole of the parietal eye field (identified in a localizer task). We also observed gaze centered, field-specific interactions (same > different orientation) in an extrastriate cluster overlapping with putative 'V4'. Based on these data and our literature review, we conclude that these supramarginal and extrastriate areas are involved in the retention, spatial updating, and evaluation of object orientation information across saccades.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptation; Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Parietal cortex; Saccadic eye movements; Trans-saccadic integration

PMID:
27424061
DOI:
10.1016/j.cortex.2016.06.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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