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J Comp Neurol. 2016 Nov 1;524(16):3127-481. doi: 10.1002/cne.24080.

Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

Author information

1
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, Washington, 98109. songd@alleninstitute.org.
2
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, Washington, 98109.
3
Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 02129.
4
Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, 90033.
5
Department of Neurobiology and Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, 06510.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201.
7
Fishberg Department of Neuroscience and Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, 11029.
8
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, Washington, 98109. EdL@alleninstitute.org.

Abstract

Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016.

KEYWORDS:

AB_2314904; DWI; MRI; RRIDs: AB_10000343; SCR_014329; amygdala; brain atlas; brainstem; cerebellum; cerebral cortex; cytoarchitecture; hippocampal formation; hypothalamus; neurofilament protein; parvalbumin; thalamus

PMID:
27418273
PMCID:
PMC5054943
DOI:
10.1002/cne.24080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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