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Appetite. 2016 Oct 1;105:731-6. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.07.011. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

First come, first served. Does pouring sequence matter for consumption?

Author information

1
Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Department of Nutritional Psychology, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstr. 12, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany. Electronic address: n.stroebele@uni-hohenheim.de.
2
Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Department of Nutritional Psychology, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstr. 12, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany. Electronic address: anastasia.dieze@uni-hohenheim.de.
3
Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Department of Nutritional Psychology, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstr. 12, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany. Electronic address: carolin.hilzendegen@uni-hohenheim.de.

Abstract

Various environmental factors associated with eating and drinking affect people's food choice and food intake. Lately, the role of tableware has been studied in more detail. The aim of this study was to determine whether pouring sequence of food components affects portion size. Study 1 invited participants to pour a beverage containing both apple juice and sparkling water. Pouring apple juice first increased juice by almost 25% compared to pouring water first. Pouring water first increased water by almost 19% compared to pouring juice first confirming our hypothesis that pouring sequence affects the ratio poured. Study 2 asked participants to prepare themselves a snack containing cereals with milk. Within-subject comparisons revealed that pouring milk before cereals significantly increased both milk and cereal amounts resulting in larger overall portion size compared to pouring cereals before adding milk. Habitual tendencies for preparing foods causing a perception bias or a perception bias itself could be possible explanations for the divergent study findings. These findings show for the first time the influence of pouring and preparation sequence on portion size.

KEYWORDS:

Eating behavior; Food preparation; Pouring sequence; Snack

PMID:
27417334
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2016.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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