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Reprod Toxicol. 2016 Oct;65:76-86. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2016.07.002. Epub 2016 Jul 10.

Maternal exposure to di-2-ethylhexylphthalate and adverse delivery outcomes: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, 2004 Mowry Rd., Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. Electronic address: lyaghjyan@ufl.edu.
2
Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, 2004 Mowry Rd., Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. Electronic address: glghita0429@ufl.edu.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, College of Medicine, 1699 SW 16th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA. Electronic address: dumonmd@peds.ufl.edu.
4
Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 125 Buckman Dr., Gainesville FL 32611, USA. Electronic address: ryost@chem.ufl.edu.
5
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: changsh@wudosis.wustl.edu.

Abstract

Adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm delivery, short gestational age, and abnormal birth weight, remain a public health concern. The evidence on the association of the most common phthalate, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) with adverse pregnancy outcomes remains equivocal. This systematic review summarizes published studies that investigated the association of DEHP with preterm delivery, gestational age, and birthweight. A comprehensive literature search found 15 relevant studies, most of which evaluated more than one outcome (four studies for preterm delivery, nine studies for gestational age, and ten studies for birthweight). Studies varied greatly with respect to study design, exposure assessment, analytical methods, and direction of the associations. We identified important methodological concerns which could have resulted in selection bias and exposure misclassification and contributed to null findings and biased associations. Given limitations of the previous studies discussed in this review, more thorough investigation of these associations is warranted to advance our scientific knowledge.

KEYWORDS:

Birthweight; Gestational age; Phthalate exposure; Preterm delivery

PMID:
27412369
PMCID:
PMC5067201
DOI:
10.1016/j.reprotox.2016.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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