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Crit Care. 2016 Jul 14;20(1):200. doi: 10.1186/s13054-016-1375-5.

The pathophysiological basis and consequences of fever.

Author information

1
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Egerton Road, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XX, UK. ewalter@nhs.net.
2
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Egerton Road, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XX, UK.

Abstract

There are numerous causes of a raised core temperature. A fever occurring in sepsis may be associated with a survival benefit. However, this is not the case for non-infective triggers. Where heat generation exceeds heat loss and the core temperature rises above that set by the hypothalamus, a combination of cellular, local, organ-specific, and systemic effects occurs and puts the individual at risk of both short-term and long-term dysfunction which, if severe or sustained, may lead to death. This narrative review is part of a series that will outline the pathophysiology of pyrogenic and non-pyrogenic fever, concentrating primarily on the pathophysiology of non-septic causes.

KEYWORDS:

Fever; Heatstroke; Hyperthermia; Organ failure; Physiopathology

PMID:
27411542
PMCID:
PMC4944485
DOI:
10.1186/s13054-016-1375-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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