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J Food Sci Technol. 2016 May;53(5):2414-21. doi: 10.1007/s13197-016-2217-9. Epub 2016 May 3.

Effect of hydrocolloids on the energy consumption and quality of frozen noodles.

Author information

1
College of Food Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150030 China ; College of Food Science and Technology, Henan Agricultural University, 63 Nong ye Rd., Zhengzhou, 450002 China.
2
College of Food Science and Technology, Henan Agricultural University, 63 Nong ye Rd., Zhengzhou, 450002 China ; Henan Engineering Laboratory of Quick-Frozen Flour-Rice Food and Prepared Food, Henan Agricultural University, 63 Nongye Rd., Zhengzhou, 450002 China.
3
College of Food Science and Technology, Henan Agricultural University, 63 Nong ye Rd., Zhengzhou, 450002 China.
4
Henan Vocational College of Agriculture, Zhongmou, Henan 451450 China.
5
College of Food Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150030 China.

Abstract

Effects of hydrocolloids such as Sodium polyacrylate, xanthan gum and sodium alginate on the energy consumption and quality of frozen cooked noodles were investigated. Results showed that gelatinization temperature (GT) shortened significantly and texture properties (hardness, firmness, break strength) of frozen cooked noodle were significantly improved by adding different hydrocolloid additives (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, there were no significant differences of glass-transition temperature between hydrocolloid fortified and non fortified frozen cooked noodles. Moreover, the hydrocolloids improved quality of cooked noodle and increased energy consumption, however, xanthan gum showed the best results. The optimized constituents were: sodium polyacrylate 0.13 %, xanthan gum 0.86 %, sodium alginate 0.18 % with predicted sensory scores of 90.30. The study showed that hydrocolloids could be used as modifying agents in frozen cooked noodle process.

KEYWORDS:

Energy saving; Frozen cooked noodles; GT; Hydrocolloids; Texture properties

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