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Psychophysiology. 2016 Oct;53(10):1451-9. doi: 10.1111/psyp.12696. Epub 2016 Jul 12.

Resting-state functional connectivity differentiates anxious apprehension and anxious arousal.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA. eburdwood@psych.udel.edu.
2
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Abstract

Brain regions in the default mode network (DMN) display greater functional connectivity at rest or during self-referential processing than during goal-directed tasks. The present study assessed resting-state connectivity as a function of anxious apprehension and anxious arousal, independent of depressive symptoms, in order to understand how these dimensions disrupt cognition. Whole-brain, seed-based analyses indicated differences between anxious apprehension and anxious arousal in DMN functional connectivity. Lower connectivity associated with higher anxious apprehension suggests decreased adaptive, inner-focused thought processes, whereas higher connectivity at higher levels of anxious arousal may reflect elevated monitoring of physiological responses to threat. These findings further the conceptualization of anxious apprehension and anxious arousal as distinct psychological dimensions with distinct neural instantiations.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Psychopathological; fMRI/PET/MRI

PMID:
27406406
PMCID:
PMC5023505
DOI:
10.1111/psyp.12696
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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