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Acad Pediatr. 2016 Nov - Dec;16(8):726-733. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.07.002. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

Injuries Associated With Strollers and Carriers Among Children in the United States, 1990 to 2010.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
2
Ohio Health Research and Innovations Institute, Columbus, Ohio.
3
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Electronic address: Lara.mckenzie@nationwidechildrens.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the incidence, rate, and characteristics of injuries associated with strollers and carriers among young children in the United States.

METHODS:

A retrospective analysis was conducted using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for children 5 years of age and younger treated in emergency departments (1990-2010), who sustained an injury associated with a stroller or carrier.

RESULTS:

An estimated 360,937 (95% confidence interval: 294,279-427,594) children aged 5 years or younger were treated in emergency departments for stroller- or carrier-related injuries, an average of 17,187 annually. Overall, the rate of stroller- and carrier-related injuries decreased significantly during the study period. Regarding stroller-related injuries, patients were most commonly male (52.4%) and younger than 1 year of age (42.0%); the head (43.0%) and face (31.0%) were most commonly injured. The most common diagnoses were soft tissue injuries (39.4%) and traumatic brain injuries/concussions (24.6%). Similarly, for carrier-related injuries, patients were most commonly male (52.5%) and younger than 1 year of age (89.0%); the head (61.5%) and face (24.7%) were most commonly injured. The most common diagnoses were soft tissue injuries (48.1%) and traumatic brain injuries/concussions (34.9%). Carrier-related injuries resulted in more hospitalizations (6.5%) than stroller-related injuries (2.4%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Stroller- and carrier-related injuries, specifically those resulting from falls from the product or tip-overs, are important sources of injury for children 5 years of age and younger. Although injuries over the 21-year study period decreased overall, the considerable number of injuries annually shows the need to further reduce the potential for injury associated with these ubiquitous products.

KEYWORDS:

National Electronic Injury Surveillance System; carriers; falls; injury; strollers; traumatic brain injury

PMID:
27402353
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2016.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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