Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Genet. 2016 Aug;48(8):947-52. doi: 10.1038/ng.3615. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

Genomic analysis of snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus) identifies genes and processes related to high-altitude adaptation.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resource in Yunnan, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, China.
3
Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
4
Agricultural Genomics Institute at Shenzhen, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Shenzhen, China.
5
Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Kunming, China.
6
Deparment of Laboratory Animal Science, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China.
7
Key Laboratory for Animal Genetic Diversity and Evolution of High Education in Yunnan Province, School of Life Sciences, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
8
Kunming College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, China.
9
College of Life Sciences, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.
10
Institute of Zoology, Shaanxi Academy of Sciences, Xi'an, China.
11
Beijing Key Laboratory of Captive Wildlife Technologies, Beijing Zoo, Beijing, China.
12
Fanjing Mountain National Nature Reserve, Guizhou, China.
13
Institue of Primatology and Human Evolution, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
14
Nujiang Prefecture Forestry Bureau, Yunnan, China.
15
Shennongjia National Nature Reserve, Hubei, China.
16
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
17
San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, Escondido, California, USA.
18
Institute of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, China.
19
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

The snub-nosed monkey genus Rhinopithecus includes five closely related species distributed across altitudinal gradients from 800 to 4,500 m. Rhinopithecus bieti, Rhinopithecus roxellana, and Rhinopithecus strykeri inhabit high-altitude habitats, whereas Rhinopithecus brelichi and Rhinopithecus avunculus inhabit lowland regions. We report the de novo whole-genome sequence of R. bieti and genomic sequences for the four other species. Eight shared substitutions were found in six genes related to lung function, DNA repair, and angiogenesis in the high-altitude snub-nosed monkeys. Functional assays showed that the high-altitude variant of CDT1 (Ala537Val) renders cells more resistant to UV irradiation, and the high-altitude variants of RNASE4 (Asn89Lys and Thr128Ile) confer enhanced ability to induce endothelial tube formation in vitro. Genomic scans in the R. bieti and R. roxellana populations identified signatures of selection between and within populations at genes involved in functions relevant to high-altitude adaptation. These results provide valuable insights into the adaptation to high altitude in the snub-nosed monkeys.

PMID:
27399969
DOI:
10.1038/ng.3615
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center