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Mar Pollut Bull. 2016 Oct 15;111(1-2):339-346. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.06.089. Epub 2016 Jul 7.

Chemometric techniques in oil classification from oil spill fingerprinting.

Author information

1
East Coast Environmental Research Institute (ESERI), Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Gong Badak Campus, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia; Faculty of Design and Engineering, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Gong Badak Campus, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia; Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia.
2
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Electronic address: ikhwan@ukm.edu.my.
3
East Coast Environmental Research Institute (ESERI), Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Gong Badak Campus, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. Electronic address: hafizanjuahir@unisza.edu.my.
4
Environmental Health Division, Department of Chemistry Malaysia, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Jalan Sultan, Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.
5
Chemistry Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
6
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia.
7
East Coast Environmental Research Institute (ESERI), Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Gong Badak Campus, 21300 Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia.

Abstract

Extended use of GC-FID and GC-MS in oil spill fingerprinting and matching is significantly important for oil classification from the oil spill sources collected from various areas of Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah (East Malaysia). Oil spill fingerprinting from GC-FID and GC-MS coupled with chemometric techniques (discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) is used as a diagnostic tool to classify the types of oil polluting the water. Clustering and discrimination of oil spill compounds in the water from the actual site of oil spill events are divided into four groups viz. diesel, Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO), Mixture Oil containing Light Fuel Oil (MOLFO) and Waste Oil (WO) according to the similarity of their intrinsic chemical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrates that diesel, HFO, MOLFO and WO are types of oil or oil products from complex oil mixtures with a total variance of 85.34% and are identified with various anthropogenic activities related to either intentional releasing of oil or accidental discharge of oil into the environment. Our results show that the use of chemometric techniques is significant in providing independent validation for classifying the types of spilled oil in the investigation of oil spill pollution in Malaysia. This, in consequence would result in cost and time saving in identification of the oil spill sources.

KEYWORDS:

Chemometric; Discriminant analysis; Fingerprinting; Oil spill; Peninsular Malaysia; Principal component analysis

PMID:
27397593
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.06.089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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