Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Exp Brain Res. 2016 Nov;234(11):3203-3212. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

Memory-guided force output is associated with self-reported ADHD symptoms in young adults.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, 266 Recreation Building, University Park, PA, USA. kan17@psu.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
3
Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, 266 Recreation Building, University Park, PA, USA.
4
Department of Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
5
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed mental health disorder in childhood and persists into adulthood in up to 65 % of cases. ADHD is associated with adverse outcomes such as the ability to gain and maintain employment and is associated with an increased risk for substance abuse obesity workplace injuries and traffic accidents A majority of diagnosed children have motor deficits; however, few studies have examined motor deficits in young adults. This study provides a novel examination of visuomotor control of grip force in young adults with and without ADHD. Participants were instructed to maintain force production over a 20-second trial with and without real-time visual feedback about their performance. The results demonstrated that when visual feedback was available, adults with ADHD produced slightly higher grip force than controls. However, when visual feedback was removed, adults with ADHD had a faster rate of decay of force, which was associated with ADHD symptom severity and trait impulsivity. These findings suggest that there may be important differences in the way that adults with ADHD integrate visual feedback during continuous motor tasks. These may account for some of the motor impairments reported in children with ADHD. These deficits could result from (1) dysfunctional sensory motor integration and/or (2) deficits in short-term visuomotor memory.

KEYWORDS:

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); Grip force; Motor control; Visual feedback

PMID:
27394915
PMCID:
PMC5073012
[Available on 2017-11-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s00221-016-4718-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Support Center