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J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Nov 4;192:53-66. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2016.07.004. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

Possible similarities between the folk medicine historically used by First Nations and American Indians in North America and the ethnoveterinary knowledge currently used in British Columbia, Canada.

Author information

1
IEZ (Institute for Ethnobotany & Zoopharmacognosy), Rijksstraatweg 158, 6573 DG Beek, Netherlands. Electronic address: lans@ethnobotany.nl.

Abstract

AIMS OF THE STUDY:

This paper compares sixty-four plants used as ethnoveterinary remedies in British Columbia with First Nations folk medicine.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In 2003, I conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 participants obtained using a purposive sample. The data was then compared with historical documents on First Nations plant use.

RESULTS:

Exact parallels between First Nations/native American folk medicine and ethnoveterinary remedies used for farm animals and horses were Acer macrophyllum Pursh, Epilobium angustifolium L. and Lonicera involucrata (Richardson) Banks ex Spreng., used as stimulants and tonics for goats; Achlys tripylla DC. as a fly repellent in barns, Alnus rubra Bong., for rabbits' dental care, Berberis repens Lindl., Rumex crispus L., to treat sores and rashes on horses, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson for stomach problems and Bovista pila Berk. and M. A. Curtis and Dolichousnea longissima (Ach.) Articus used on wounds.

CONCLUSION:

This study revealed the parallel uses between sixty-four plants used as ethnoveterinary medicines in British Columbia and the folk medicines used by the First Nations peoples and by native American groups.

KEYWORDS:

British Columbia; Ethnoveterinary; First Nations; Knowledge transmission

PMID:
27394389
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2016.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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