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Air Med J. 2016 Jul-Aug;35(4):239-41. doi: 10.1016/j.amj.2016.01.005. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

Limb Replantation in Air-Transported Patients: A 4-Year Study.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; MedFlight, Columbus, OH. Electronic address: hwerman@medflight.com.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens, OH.
4
Department of Plastic Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Hand and Microsurgery Associates, Columbus, OH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Patients who require extremity reimplantation represent a population in whom rapid transport could provide potential benefit. Only 1 previous report has described the use of air transport in patients with these injuries. We describe our experience in air medical transport of limb reimplantation candidates.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review for all patients with amputation or near-amputation extremity injuries who were transported by helicopter to a regional reimplantation center over a 4-year period was conducted. The primary outcome measure was patients who were taken to the operating room (OR) for a definitive repair attempt by the surgical team.

RESULTS:

Of the 115 patients, 104 were taken to the OR (90%), and 84 (80%) had a repair attempted. Similar results were found between those patients who were transported from the scene or another hospital with regard to the number of candidates taken to the OR and the number of patients in who definitive repair was attempted.

CONCLUSION:

Air medical transport can play an important role in a regional reimplantation program.

PMID:
27393761
DOI:
10.1016/j.amj.2016.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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