Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2016 Aug 1;55(32):9365-70. doi: 10.1002/anie.201603813. Epub 2016 Jul 8.

Immobilization of the Gas Signaling Molecule H2 S by Radioisotopes: Detection, Quantification, and In Vivo Imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Department of Anatomy, BK21 Plus Program, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 41944, Korea.
2
Molecular Imaging Research Centre, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul, 01812, Korea.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Keio University, Tokyo, 105-8512, Japan.
4
Department of Chemistry, Daegu University, Gyeongsan, 38453, Korea.
5
Department of Molecular Medicine, Department of Anatomy, BK21 Plus Program, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 41944, Korea. yooj@knu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has multifunctional roles as a gas signaling molecule in living systems. However, the efficient detection and imaging of H2 S in live animals is very challenging. Herein, we report the first radioisotope-based immobilization technique for the detection, quantification, and in vivo imaging of endogenous H2 S. Macrocyclic (64) Cu complexes that instantly reacted with gaseous H2 S to form insoluble (64) CuS in a highly sensitive and selective manner were prepared. The H2 S concentration in biological samples was measured by a thin-layer radiochromatography method. When (64) Cu-cyclen was injected into mice, an elevated H2 S concentration in the inflamed paw was clearly visualized and quantified by Cerenkov luminescence and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. PET imaging was also able to pinpoint increased H2 S levels in a millimeter-sized infarcted lesion of the rat heart.

KEYWORDS:

gas immobilization; hydrogen sulfide; imaging agents; nuclear imaging; radioisotopes

PMID:
27392287
DOI:
10.1002/anie.201603813
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center