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Early Hum Dev. 2016 Aug;99:43-51. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2016.05.011. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

Effects of pre- and post-natal lipid-based nutrient supplements on infant development in a randomized trial in Ghana.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, 3253 Meyer Hall, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. Electronic address: elprado@ucdavis.edu.
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Box LG, 134, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
3
Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, 3253 Meyer Hall, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA, 95616, USA; Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Box LG, 134, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
4
Center for Child Health Research, University of Tampere School of Medicine and Tampere University Hospital, Arvo building, FIN33014, University of Tampere, Finland; Department of Paediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, POB 2000, FIN33521 Tampere, Finland.
5
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California Davis, 2135 Social Sciences and Humanities, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
6
Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, 3253 Meyer Hall, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Maternal and infant undernutrition is negatively associated with infant development.

AIMS:

We tested the hypothesis that provision of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) to pregnant women and infants positively affects infant development.

STUDY DESIGN:

In a partially double-blind randomized controlled trial, we compared the following daily maternal supplements during pregnancy and until 6months post-partum: iron/folic acid capsule (IFA), capsule containing 18 micronutrients (MMN), or 20g SQ-LNS. Children in the SQ-LNS group also received SQ-LNS from age 6 to 18months. The study is registered as NCT00970866.

SUBJECTS:

1320 pregnant women in Ghana enrolled in the trial; 1173 of their children participated in developmental assessment.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

We monitored the acquisition of 10 developmental milestones monthly by parental report, observed the attainment of 6 motor milestones at 6, 12, and 18months, and conducted detailed assessment of motor, language, socio-emotional, and executive function at 18months.

RESULTS:

By researcher observation, a greater percentage of children in the SQ-LNS group (53%) was able to walk alone at 12months than in the IFA group (43%; RR=1.23, 95% CI=1.02-1.49; p=0.025). We found no significant differences between groups in milestone acquisition by parent report or in any scores at 18months. The difference in mean z-scores between groups ranged from 0.03-0.13 for motor (p=0.84), 0.01-0.08 for language (p=0.46), 0.01-0.02 for socio-emotional (p=0.75), and 0.00-0.02 for executive function (p=0.95).

CONCLUSION:

While provision of maternal and child SQ-LNS in Ghana may affect walking at 12months, it did not affect infant development at 18months.

KEYWORDS:

Executive function; Language development; Lipid-based nutrient supplements; Motor development; Multiple micronutrients; Socio-emotional development

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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