Format

Send to

Choose Destination
mSphere. 2016 Jun 29;1(4). pii: e00099-16. doi: 10.1128/mSphere.00099-16. eCollection 2016 Jul-Aug.

Potential Roles of Fungal Extracellular Vesicles during Infection.

Author information

1
Departamento de Microbiologia Geral, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA.
2
Departamento de Microbiologia Geral, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
3
Departamento de Microbiologia Geral, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico em Saúde (CDTS) da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
4
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, New York, USA.

Abstract

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are produced by virtually all cell types. Within the past few years, work in this field has revealed more information about fungal EVs. Fungal EVs have been shown to carry proteins, lipids, pigments, polysaccharides, and RNA; these components are known virulence factors, a fact which supports the hypothesis that fungal EVs concentrate pathogenic determinants. Additionally, recent studies have demonstrated that fungal EVs stimulate the host immune system. In this review, putative roles of fungal EVs are discussed, including their potential as vaccination tools and their possible contribution to pathogenesis in invasive fungal diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Fungal pathogenesis; ceramide; fungi; glycolipids; sphingolipids; vesicles

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Society for Microbiology Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center