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J Phys Ther Sci. 2016 Jun;28(6):1795-800. doi: 10.1589/jpts.28.1795. Epub 2016 Jun 28.

Self-selected intensity, ratings of perceived exertion, and affective responses in sedentary male subjects during resistance training.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.
2
Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Vale do Sao Francisco, Brazil.
3
Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; Department of Physical Education, Londrina State University, Brazil.
4
Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraná, Brazil.

Abstract

[Purpose] This study examined the exercise intensity and psychophysiological responses to a self-selected resistance training session in sedentary male subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve sedentary male subjects (35.8 ± 5.8 years; 25.5 ± 2.6 kg·m(2)) underwent four sessions at 48-h intervals: familiarization; two sessions of one repetition maximum test and a resistance training session in which they were told to self-select a load to complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions of chest press, leg press, seated rows, knee extension, overhead press, biceps curl, and triceps pushdown exercises. During the latter, the percentage of one repetition maximum, affective responses (feeling scale), and rating of perceived exertion (OMNI-RES scale) were measured. [Results] The percentage of one repetition maximum for all exercises was >51% (14-31% variability), the rating of perceived exertion was 5-6 (7-11% variability), and the affective responses was 0-1 point with large variability. [Conclusion] Sedentary male subjects self-selected approximately 55% of one maximum repetition, which was above the intensity suggested to increase strength in sedentary individuals, but below the recommended intensity to improve strength in novice to intermediate exercisers. The rating of perceived exertion was indicative of moderate intensity and slightly positive affective responses.

KEYWORDS:

Adherence; Guidelines; Pleasure/displeasure

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