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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016 Aug;40(8):1737-43. doi: 10.1111/acer.13142. Epub 2016 Jul 8.

Effects of Heavy Drinking on T-Cell Phenotypes Consistent with Immunosenescence in Untreated HIV Infection.

Author information

1
Boston University School of Medicine/Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont.
5
St.-Petersburg Bekhterev Research Psychoneurological Institute, Pavlov State Medical University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
6
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role of alcohol consumption in HIV-related adaptive immune dysfunction is debated. We hypothesized that heavy drinking would be associated with greater evidence of immunosenescence (i.e., aging-related decline of adaptive immune function) among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve HIV-infected individuals.

METHODS:

Using data from the Russia ARCH cohort study, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals recruited between 2012 and 2014.

INDEPENDENT VARIABLE:

Heavy drinking defined as >4 standard drinks in a day (or >14 standard drinks per week) for men and >3 per day (or >7 per week) for women, respectively.

DEPENDENT VARIABLES:

Percentage of CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells with a phenotype consistent with immunosenescence (i.e., expressing CD28- CD57+, or memory [CD45RO+ CD45RA+] phenotype and not the naïve [CD45RO- CD45RA+] phenotype).

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

Multiple linear regression adjusted for confounders.

RESULTS:

Of 214 eligible participants, 61% were heavy drinkers. Mean age was 33 years and the cohort was predominantly male (72%). Hepatitis C prevalence was high (87%) and mean log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml was 4.6. We found no significant differences by drinking status in the percentage of immunosenescent, memory, or naïve CD8+ or CD4+ T-cells.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this cross-sectional analysis, heavy drinking in the setting of untreated HIV infection did not appear to be associated with alterations in T-cell phenotypes consistent with immunosenescence. To substantiate these findings, longitudinal studies should assess whether changes in alcohol consumption are associated with changes in these and other immunosenescent T-cell phenotypes.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Heavy Drinking; Immunosenescence; Russia; T-Cell

PMID:
27388907
PMCID:
PMC5070699
DOI:
10.1111/acer.13142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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