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Exp Mol Med. 2016 Jul 8;48(7):e244. doi: 10.1038/emm.2016.49.

Bee venom phospholipase A2 ameliorates motor dysfunction and modulates microglia activation in Parkinson's disease alpha-synuclein transgenic mice.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Korean Medicine (KM)-Application Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM), Daegu, Republic of Korea.
3
Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medical Science Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Anatomy-Pointlogy, College of Korean Medicine, Gachon University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

α-Synuclein (α-Syn) has a critical role in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, which leads to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent studies have shown that bee venom (BV) has beneficial effects on PD symptoms in human patients or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxin-induced PD mice. This study investigated whether treatment with BV-derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) would improve the motor dysfunction and pathological features of PD in human A53T α-Syn mutant transgenic (A53T Tg) mice. The motor dysfunction of A53T Tg mice was assessed using the pole test. The levels of α-Syn, microglia and the M1/M2 phenotype in the spinal cord were evaluated by immunofluorescence. bvPLA2 treatment significantly ameliorated motor dysfunction in A53T Tg mice. In addition, bvPLA2 significantly reduced the expression of α-Syn, the activation and numbers of microglia, and the ratio of M1/M2 in A53T Tg mice. These results suggest that bvPLA2 could be a promising treatment option for PD.

PMID:
27388550
PMCID:
PMC4973312
DOI:
10.1038/emm.2016.49
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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