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J Neurophysiol. 2016 Oct 1;116(4):1554-1563. doi: 10.1152/jn.00361.2016. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

Membrane potential resonance frequency directly influences network frequency through electrical coupling.

Author information

1
Federated Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey; and.
2
Federated Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey; and Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey.
3
Federated Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey; and Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey farzan@njit.edu.

Abstract

Oscillatory networks often include neurons with membrane potential resonance, exhibiting a peak in the voltage amplitude as a function of current input at a nonzero (resonance) frequency (fres). Although fres has been correlated to the network frequency (fnet) in a variety of systems, a causal relationship between the two has not been established. We examine the hypothesis that combinations of biophysical parameters that shift fres, without changing other attributes of the impedance profile, also shift fnet in the same direction. We test this hypothesis, computationally and experimentally, in an electrically coupled network consisting of intrinsic oscillator (O) and resonator (R) neurons. We use a two-cell model of such a network to show that increasing fres of R directly increases fnet and that this effect becomes more prominent if the amplitude of resonance is increased. Notably, the effect of fres on fnet is independent of the parameters that define the oscillator or the combination of parameters in R that produce the shift in fres, as long as this combination produces the same impedance vs. frequency relationship. We use the dynamic clamp technique to experimentally verify the model predictions by connecting a model resonator to the pacemaker pyloric dilator neurons of the crab Cancer borealis pyloric network using electrical synapses and show that the pyloric network frequency can be shifted by changing fres in the resonator. Our results provide compelling evidence that fres and resonance amplitude strongly influence fnet, and therefore, modulators may target these attributes to modify rhythmic activity.

KEYWORDS:

computational modeling; dynamic clamp; oscillations; resonance; stomatogastric

PMID:
27385799
PMCID:
PMC5144696
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00361.2016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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