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J Sport Exerc Psychol. 2016 Aug;38(4):331-340. doi: 10.1123/jsep.2015-0335. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

The Effects of Acute Exercise on Memory and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF).

Author information

1
1 University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Abstract

Acute exercise benefits cognition, and some evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in this effect. The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise intensity, memory, and BDNF. Young adults completed 3 exercise sessions at different intensities relative to ventilator threshold (Vt) (VO2max, Vt - 20%, Vt + 20%). For each session, participants exercised for approximately 30 min. Following exercise, they performed the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) to assess short-term memory, learning, and long-term memory recall. Twenty-four hours later, they completed the RAVLT recognition trial, which provided another measure of long-term memory. Blood was drawn before exercise, immediately postexercise, and after the 30-min recall test. Results indicated that long-term memory as assessed after the 24-hr delay differed as a function of exercise intensity with the largest benefits observed following maximal intensity exercise. BDNF data showed a significant increase in response to exercise; however, there were no differences relative to exercise intensity and there were no significant associations between BDNF and memory. Future research is warranted so that we can better understand how to use exercise to benefit cognitive performance.

KEYWORDS:

cognition; cognitive performance; learning; physical activity

PMID:
27385735
DOI:
10.1123/jsep.2015-0335
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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