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Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):324-33. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.133561. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men.

Author information

1
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD; kevinh@niddk.nih.gov.
2
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD;
3
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA;
4
Columbia University, New York, NY; and.
5
The Translational Research Institute for Metabolism and Diabetes, Orlando, FL.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity posits that habitual consumption of a high-carbohydrate diet sequesters fat within adipose tissue because of hyperinsulinemia and results in adaptive suppression of energy expenditure (EE). Therefore, isocaloric exchange of dietary carbohydrate for fat is predicted to result in increased EE, increased fat oxidation, and loss of body fat. In contrast, a more conventional view that "a calorie is a calorie" predicts that isocaloric variations in dietary carbohydrate and fat will have no physiologically important effects on EE or body fat.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated whether an isocaloric low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) is associated with changes in EE, respiratory quotient (RQ), and body composition.

DESIGN:

Seventeen overweight or obese men were admitted to metabolic wards, where they consumed a high-carbohydrate baseline diet (BD) for 4 wk followed by 4 wk of an isocaloric KD with clamped protein. Subjects spent 2 consecutive days each week residing in metabolic chambers to measure changes in EE (EEchamber), sleeping EE (SEE), and RQ. Body composition changes were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Average EE during the final 2 wk of the BD and KD periods was measured by doubly labeled water (EEDLW).

RESULTS:

Subjects lost weight and body fat throughout the study corresponding to an overall negative energy balance of ∼300 kcal/d. Compared with BD, the KD coincided with increased EEchamber (57 ± 13 kcal/d, P = 0.0004) and SEE (89 ± 14 kcal/d, P < 0.0001) and decreased RQ (-0.111 ± 0.003, P < 0.0001). EEDLW increased by 151 ± 63 kcal/d (P = 0.03). Body fat loss slowed during the KD and coincided with increased protein utilization and loss of fat-free mass.

CONCLUSION:

The isocaloric KD was not accompanied by increased body fat loss but was associated with relatively small increases in EE that were near the limits of detection with the use of state-of-the-art technology. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01967563.

KEYWORDS:

body composition; carbohydrate; energy expenditure; fat; insulin; ketogenic diet; macronutrients

PMID:
27385608
PMCID:
PMC4962163
[Available on 2017-08-01]
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.133561
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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