Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nature. 2016 Jul 7;535(7610):56-64. doi: 10.1038/nature18846.

Diet-microbiota interactions as moderators of human metabolism.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
2
Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Section for Metabolic Receptology, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

It is widely accepted that obesity and associated metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, are intimately linked to diet. However, the gut microbiota has also become a focus for research at the intersection of diet and metabolic health. Mechanisms that link the gut microbiota with obesity are coming to light through a powerful combination of translation-focused animal models and studies in humans. A body of knowledge is accumulating that points to the gut microbiota as a mediator of dietary impact on the host metabolic status. Efforts are focusing on the establishment of causal relationships in people and the prospect of therapeutic interventions such as personalized nutrition.

PMID:
27383980
PMCID:
PMC5991619
DOI:
10.1038/nature18846
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center