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Syst Appl Microbiol. 2016 Jul;39(5):307-12. doi: 10.1016/j.syapm.2016.06.004. Epub 2016 Jun 25.

Proposal of Helicobacter canicola sp. nov., previously identified as Helicobacter cinaedi, isolated from canines.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Aichi Gakuin University, School of Pharmacy, 1-100 Kusumoto-cho, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8650, Japan. Electronic address: kawamura@dpc.agu.ac.jp.
2
Department of Microbiology, Aichi Gakuin University, School of Pharmacy, 1-100 Kusumoto-cho, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8650, Japan. Electronic address: jtomida@dpc.agu.ac.jp.
3
Pathogenic Microbe Laboratory, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan. Electronic address: takiyam@ri.ncgm.go.jp.
4
Intensive Care Unit, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan. Electronic address: tatton.ncgm@gmail.com.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Okinawa Chubu Hospital, 281 Miyazato, Uruma, Okinawa 902-2293, Japan. Electronic address: masashi.narita@gmail.com.
6
Emergency, Critical Care and Anesthesia, Ohta General Hospital Foundation, Ohta Nishinouchi Hospital, 2-5-20, Nishinouchi, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8558, Japan. Electronic address: katsu0419@gmail.com.
7
Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Ghent University, K.L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: Margo.Cnockaert@UGent.be.
8
Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Ghent University, K.L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: Peter.Vandamme@UGent.be.
9
Department of Microbiology, Aichi Gakuin University, School of Pharmacy, 1-100 Kusumoto-cho, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8650, Japan. Electronic address: yujmor@dpc.agu.ac.jp.
10
Department of Microbiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjou, Kumamoto, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan. Electronic address: sawat@kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
11
Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Molecular Toxicology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575, Japan. Electronic address: takaike@med.tohoku.ac.jp.

Abstract

During the course of our taxonomic investigation of Helicobacter cinaedi, it was realized that the strains isolated from dogs, which have been identified as H. cinaedi, showed different biochemical traits than did the isolates obtained from humans. None of the three dog isolates could reduce nitrate to nitrite, whereas all of the human H. cinaedi isolates could do so. The dog isolates showed a strong positive alkaline phosphatase reaction and could grow at 42°C, however the human isolates showed negative to very weak responses to those tests. The GyrA protein based phylogenetic analysis showed that the three isolates from dogs formed a slightly distinct cluster from the human isolate cluster. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, gyrB, and hsp60 gene sequences further confirmed that the dog isolates differed from the human H. cinaedi isolate cluster. The whole-genome in silico DNA similarities of each isolate based on their full genome sequences revealed that the isolates from dogs shared more than 94.9% ANIb (average nucleotide identity based on BLAST), while 94.0% ANIb were found between the isolates from dogs and the humans, including the H. cinaedi type strain ATCC BAA-847(T) (=CCUG 18818(T)). From these data, we propose a new species, 'H. canicola' sp. nov., for the isolates from dogs. The type strain is PAGU 1410(T) (CCUG 33887(T)=LMG 29580(T)).

KEYWORDS:

16S rRNA; 23S rRNA; Average nucleotide identity (ANI); Canine; DNA gyrase; DNA–DNA hybridization; Heat shock protein; In silico DNA similarity analysis

PMID:
27381809
DOI:
10.1016/j.syapm.2016.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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