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Dig Liver Dis. 2016 Oct;48(10):1249-54. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2016.06.011. Epub 2016 Jun 21.

Prescription drugs associated with false-positive results when using faecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention and Control Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
2
Cancer Prevention and Control Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mgarcia@iconcologia.net.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBEResp), Spain.
4
Cancer Prevention and Control Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBEResp), Spain.
5
Cancer Prevention and Control Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBEResp), Spain; Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The most common side effect in population screening programmes is a false-positive result which leads to unnecessary risks and costs.

AIMS:

To identify factors associated with false-positive results in a colorectal cancer screening programme with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional study of 472 participants with a positive FIT who underwent colonoscopy for confirmation of diagnosis between 2013 and 2014. A false-positive result was defined as having a positive FIT (≥20μg haemoglobin per gram of faeces) and follow-up colonoscopy without intermediate/high-risk lesions or cancer.

RESULTS:

Women showed a two-fold increased likelihood of a false-positive result compared with men (adjusted OR, 2.3; 95%CI, 1.5-3.4), but no female-specific factor was identified. The other variables associated with a false-positive result were successive screening (adjusted OR, 1.5; 95%CI, 1.0-2.2), anal disorders (adjusted OR, 3.1; 95%CI, 2.1-4.5) and the use of proton pump inhibitors (adjusted OR, 1.8; 95%CI, 1.1-2.9). Successive screening and proton pump inhibitor use were associated with FP in men. None of the other drugs were related to a false-positive FIT.

CONCLUSION:

Concurrent use of proton pump inhibitors at the time of FIT might increase the likelihood of a false-positive result. Further investigation is needed to determine whether discontinuing them could decrease the false-positive rate.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer screening; Faecal immunochemical test; False positive; Screening

PMID:
27378703
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2016.06.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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