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Clin Lung Cancer. 2016 Nov;17(6):550-557. doi: 10.1016/j.cllc.2016.05.013. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Optimizing Survival of Patients With Marginally Operable Stage IIIA Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Chemoradiotherapy With or Without Surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
2
Department of Chest Surgery, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
5
Department of Chest Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
6
Department of Chest Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei, Taiwan.
7
Department of Chest Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: M000721@ms.skh.org.tw.
8
Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei City, Taiwan. Electronic address: M006565@ms.skh.org.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

For marginally operable stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery might not be done as planned after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for reasons (unresectable or medically inoperable conditions, or patient refusal). This study aims to investigate the outcomes of a phased CCRT protocol established to maximize the operability of marginally operable stage IIIA NSCLC and to care for reassessed inoperable patients, in comparison with continuous-course definitive CCRT.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Forty-seven patients with marginally operable stage IIIA NSCLC receiving CCRT were included. Twenty-eight patients were treated with our phased CCRT protocol, including neoadjuvant CCRT followed by surgery (group A, n = 16) or, for reassessed inoperable patients, maintenance chemotherapy and split-course CCRT boost (group B, n = 12). The other 19 were treated with continuous-course definitive CCRT (group C). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Among all, median OS and PFS were 35.6 and 12.8 months, respectively (median follow-up, 22.3 months). The median OS of group A (not reached) was better than that of group B (34.4 months) and group C (15.2 months) (P = .009). On multivariate analysis, performance status 0 to 1 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.026; P < .001), adenocarcinoma (HR, 0.156; P = .003), and group A (HR, 0.199; P = .033) were independent prognostic factors. The OS of group B (HR, 0.450; 95% confidence interval, 0.118-1.717; P = .243) was not statistically different from that of group C.

CONCLUSIONS:

For marginally operable stage IIIA NSCLC, our phased CCRT strategy may optimize survival by maximizing operability and maintain an acceptable survival for reassessed inoperable patients by split-course CCRT boost following maintenance chemotherapy.

KEYWORDS:

Chemoradiotherapy; Marginally operable; Non–small cell lung cancer; Stage IIIA; Surgery

PMID:
27378175
DOI:
10.1016/j.cllc.2016.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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