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J Infect Dis. 2016 Oct 15;214(suppl 3):S102-S109. Epub 2016 Jul 4.

Ebola Virus Epidemiology and Evolution in Nigeria.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases, Redeemer's University, Ede, Osun State.
2
Department of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT Department of FAS Center for Systems Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge.
3
Department of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.
4
Department of Biological Sciences.
5
Department de Parasitologie et Mycologie, Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Fann, Dakar, Senegal.
6
Department of Biochemistry.
7
Department of Center for Genome Sciences, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Massachusetts.
8
Department of The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Translational Science Institute, La Jolla, California.
9
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos.
10
African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases, Redeemer's University, Ede, Osun State Department of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.
11
African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases, Redeemer's University, Ede, Osun State Department of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT Department of FAS Center for Systems Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge.
12
Department of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control, Abuja.
13
African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases, Redeemer's University, Ede, Osun State Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.
14
Department of Biological Sciences Department of Nigerian Academy of Science, Akoka-Yaba, Lagos.
15
African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases, Redeemer's University, Ede, Osun State Department of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT Department of FAS Center for Systems Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge Department of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase.

Abstract

Containment limited the 2014 Nigerian Ebola virus (EBOV) disease outbreak to 20 reported cases and 8 fatalities. We present here clinical data and contact information for at least 19 case patients, and full-length EBOV genome sequences for 12 of the 20. The detailed contact data permits nearly complete reconstruction of the transmission tree for the outbreak. The EBOV genomic data are consistent with that tree. It confirms that there was a single source for the Nigerian infections, shows that the Nigerian EBOV lineage nests within a lineage previously seen in Liberia but is genetically distinct from it, and supports the conclusion that transmission from Nigeria to elsewhere did not occur.

KEYWORDS:

Ebola; Nigeria; epidemiology; genomic; outbreak; phylogeny; sequencing

PMID:
27377746
PMCID:
PMC5050462
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiw190
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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