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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2016 Aug 5;371(1700). pii: 20150418. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2015.0418.

Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions.

Author information

1
Cardiff School of Biosciences and Systems Immunity Institute, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, Wales, UK petersenoh@cardiff.ac.uk.
2
Faculty of Life Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK.

Abstract

Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50-100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca(2+) acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca(2+) gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca(2+) transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca(2+) signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca(2+) signalling relies on cell specific Ca(2+) signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca(2+) signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca(2+) signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'.

KEYWORDS:

adenosine triphosphate; calcium; calcium channels; evolution of calcium signalling

PMID:
27377728
PMCID:
PMC4938019
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2015.0418
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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