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Clin Immunol. 2018 Apr;189:23-28. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2016.06.017. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

The contribution of neutrophils to CNS autoimmunity.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, University of Washington, Box 358059, 750 Republican St., Seattle, WA 98109-8509, USA.
2
Department of Immunology, University of Washington, Box 358059, 750 Republican St., Seattle, WA 98109-8509, USA. Electronic address: goverman@uw.edu.

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is believed to be initiated when myelin-specific T cells infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS), triggering subsequent recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes to the CNS. The contribution of neutrophils to CNS autoimmune disease has been underappreciated, but several studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, indicate that neutrophils have an important role in inflammation. Neutrophils are hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of EAE by producing cytokines and promoting breakdown of the blood brain barrier. Neutrophils may also influence the manifestation of EAE by facilitating parenchymal brain inflammation. This review summarizes evidence supporting a functional role for neutrophils in EAE and MS, highlighting the differential regulation of neutrophil recruitment in the brain and spinal cord.

KEYWORDS:

CXCR2; EAE; IL-17; MS; Neutrophils

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