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J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2017 Jul-Aug;57(7-8):1069-1079. doi: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06421-5. Epub 2016 Jul 5.

Effects of mental training on muscular force, hormonal and physiological changes in kickboxers.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, Bizerte, Tunisia - maamer2011@hotmail.fr.
2
Research Laboratory "Sports performance Optimization", National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports (CNMSS), Tunis, Tunisia - maamer2011@hotmail.fr.
3
Qatar Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, Aspire Zone, ASPETAR, Doha, Qatar.
4
School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
5
University of the West of Scotland, Institute of Clinical Exercise and Health Science, Ayr, UK.
6
Unit of Research "Molecular Bases of Human Diseases", Sfax Medicine College, Sfax, Tunisia.
7
High Institute of Applied Biology of Médenine, Médenine, Tunisia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of mental training on muscular force generation, hormonal alterations, and physiological adaptations in male trained kickboxers.

METHODS:

Fifty-three male trained kickboxers (24.2±4.4 years, 1.75±0.08 m and 70.4±10.2 kg) were randomly assigned to a physical-training group (PG; N.=20), physical and mental training group (PMG: N.=18, mental-training package [MTP] plus physical training] or control group (CG: N.=15). Physical fitness tests: countermovement jump (CMJ), medicine ball throw (MBT), bench press, and half-squat tests; hormones: resting cortisol (C) blood sample, plasma testosterone (T) concentration, and T/C ratio; and physiological variables: resting heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) were assessed before training commenced (baseline) and at week 6 and 12 of training.

RESULTS:

PMG and PG improved performance in CMJ height (16.2%, 8.4%), MBT (27.9%, 14.2%), bench press (26.5%, 15.7%), half-squat (27.2%, 16.3%), T concentration (35.2%, 22.4%), and T/C ratio (60%, 0%, for PMG only), respectively. In contrast, the C concentration decreased for the PMG (16.3%) and increased for the PG (22%) after 12 weeks. The PMG and PG had significant decrease from pre- to post-training for the resting HR (9.1%, 3%, respectively) and BP (8.5%, 5.3%, respectively). Furthermore, there was a significant increase in MBT (9.3%) after 6 weeks in PMG. Outlined improvements (PMG and PG) were favorable compared to CG (P<0.05) in all instances.

CONCLUSIONS:

The greater muscular force generation in PMG than PG seem to be explained by the reduction of hormonal and physiological stress after 12 weeks.

PMID:
27377252
DOI:
10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06421-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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