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Nutr Metab Insights. 2016 Jun 20;9:25-30. doi: 10.4137/NMI.S39764. eCollection 2016.

Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
2
Empirical Labs, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.; Nutritional Biomimetics LLC, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.; Present address: Valimenta Labs, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

Intravenous administration of vitamin C has been shown to decrease oxidative stress and, in some instances, improve physiological function in adult humans. Oral vitamin C administration is typically less effective than intravenous, due in part to inferior vitamin C bioavailability. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of oral delivery of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes. On 4 separate randomly ordered occasions, 11 men and women were administered an oral placebo, or 4 g of vitamin C via oral, oral liposomal, or intravenous delivery. The data indicate that oral delivery of 4 g of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes (1) produces circulating concentrations of vitamin C that are greater than unencapsulated oral but less than intravenous administration and (2) provides protection from ischemia-reperfusion-mediated oxidative stress that is similar to the protection provided by unencapsulated oral and intravenous administrations.

KEYWORDS:

intravenous; liposome; oral; oxidative stress; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances

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