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Food Chem. 2016 Dec 1;212:663-70. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.06.021. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Effect of heating/reheating of fats/oils, as used by Asian Indians, on trans fatty acid formation.

Author information

1
National Diabetes, Obesity and Cholesterol Foundation (N-DOC), C 6/57, SDA, New Delhi 110016, India; Diabetes Foundation (India), C 6/57, SDA, New Delhi 110016, India; Center of Nutrition and Metabolic Research (C-NET), New Delhi 110016, India; Institute of Home Economics, University of Delhi, F-4, Hauz Khas Enclave, New Delhi 110016, India.
2
Institute of Home Economics, University of Delhi, F-4, Hauz Khas Enclave, New Delhi 110016, India; Public Health Nutrition Div, LSTech Ventures Pvt Ltd., New Delhi, India.
3
National Diabetes, Obesity and Cholesterol Foundation (N-DOC), C 6/57, SDA, New Delhi 110016, India; Diabetes Foundation (India), C 6/57, SDA, New Delhi 110016, India; Center of Nutrition and Metabolic Research (C-NET), New Delhi 110016, India; Fortis C-DOC Center for Excellence for Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases and Endocrinology, B-16, Chirag Enclave, Nehru Place, New Delhi 110048, India. Electronic address: anoopmisra@gmail.com.
4
Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016, India.
5
Department of Biostatistics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India.

Abstract

Heating/frying and reuse of edible fats/oils induces chemical changes such as formation of trans fatty acids (TFAs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heating/frying on formation of TFAs in fats/oils. Using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detector, TFA was estimated in six commonly used fat/oils in India (refined soybean oil, groundnut oil, olive oil, rapeseed oil, clarified butter, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil), before and after subjecting them to heating/frying at 180°C and 220°C. All six fats/oils subjected to heating/frying demonstrated an increase in TFAs (p<0.001), saturated fatty acids (p<0.001) and decrease in cis-unsaturated fatty acids (p<0.001). The absolute increase in TFA content of edible oils (after subjecting to heating/reheating) ranged between 2.30±0.89g/100g and 4.5±1.43g/100g; amongst edible fats it ranged between 2.60±0.38g/100g and 5.96±1.94g/100g. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups (heating and frying; p=0.892). Considering the undesirable health effects of TFA, appropriate guidelines for heating/re-frying of edible fats/oils by Asian Indians should be devised.

KEYWORDS:

Asian Indians; Edible oils; Fats; Fatty acids; Frying; Heating; Reheating; Trans fatty acids

PMID:
27374582
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.06.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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