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Food Chem. 2016 Dec 1;212:411-9. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.05.190. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Effects of domestic processing methods on the phytochemical content of watercress (Nasturtium officinale).

Author information

1
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, United Kingdom. Electronic address: n.giallourou@pgr.reading.ac.uk.
2
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, United Kingdom.
3
Institute of Food and Health, School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Abstract

The impact of conventional cooking and processing methods on total phenols, antioxidant activity, carotenoids and glucosinolates of watercress was evaluated. Boiling significantly decreases phenolic content, antioxidant activity and recoverable glucosinolates, however it increases the carotenoid concentrations of watercress as compared to the raw vegetable. Cooking by microwaving and steaming maintains the majority of phytochemicals in comparison to the fresh material, suggesting that they should be used as the preferred methods of watercress preparation. Boiling of watercress should be avoided to ensure maximum ingestion of watercress-derived beneficial phytochemicals.

KEYWORDS:

Brassica; Carotenoids; Flavonols; Glucosinolates; Phenolics; Phytochemicals; Processing; Watercress

PMID:
27374550
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.05.190
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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