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Health Econ. 2016 Aug;25(8):933-8. doi: 10.1002/hec.3366.

Unrelated Future Costs and Unrelated Future Benefits: Reflections on NICE Guide to the Methods of Technology Appraisal.

Author information

1
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
2
Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.
3
University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
4
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
5
Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
6
University of York, York, UK.
7
NHS Health Scotland, Edinburgh, UK.
8
NICE, St George's Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

In this editorial, we consider the vexing issue of 'unrelated future costs' (for example, the costs of caring for people with dementia or kidney failure after preventing their deaths from a heart attack). The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance is not to take such costs into account in technology appraisals. However, standard appraisal practice involves modelling the benefits of those unrelated technologies. We argue that there is a sound principled reason for including both the costs and benefits of unrelated care. Changing this practice would have material consequences for decisions about reimbursing particular technologies, and we urge future research to understand this better.

KEYWORDS:

cost effectiveness analysis; costing; economic analysis; health technology assessment; unrelated future costs

PMID:
27374115
DOI:
10.1002/hec.3366
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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