Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Jul;138(1):47-56. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2016.02.046.

Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases: Interactions between microbes, cellular metabolism, and inflammation.

Author information

1
Institute of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiochemistry, Molecular Diagnostics, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
2
Centre for Neuropsychiatric Research, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
3
Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.
4
Department of Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.
5
Faculty of Health Sciences, COPSAC, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, Mass.
7
Clinical Pathobiochemistry, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
8
Institute for Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
9
Department of Psychiatry, University of Munster, Munster, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
10
Center of Experimental Rheumatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
11
Division Allergy and Immunology, Clinical Science Center, Madison, Wis.
12
Skin and Allergy Hospital, University Hospital Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
13
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
14
Clinic of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
15
Medical Clinic of Gastroenterology, Pneumonology, Endocrinology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
16
Department of Biochemistry, Medical Faculty, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
17
Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis (CTH), University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
18
Centre for Clinical Microbiology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
19
Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
20
Institute for Lung Research, Universities of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Philipps-University Marburg, and the Department of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
21
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University, St Louis, Mo.
22
Institute of Medical Microbiology, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
23
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
24
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
25
Children's Hospital, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
26
Institute of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiochemistry, Molecular Diagnostics, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany. Electronic address: harald.renz@uk-gm.de.

Abstract

Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic inflammation; biodiversity; environment; epigenetics; immune dysregulation; metabolism; stress

PMID:
27373325
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2016.02.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center