Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurol. 2016 Nov;263(11):2339-2354. Epub 2016 Jul 2.

Hearing and dementia.

Author information

1
Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Dementia Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK.
2
Cognitive Disorders Clinic for the Deaf, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK.
3
Auditory Group, Institute of Neuroscience, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
4
Central Auditory Disorders Clinic, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK.
5
Department of Neuro-otology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK.
6
UCL Ear Institute, University College London, London, UK.
7
Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Dementia Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK. jason.warren@ucl.ac.uk.
8
Central Auditory Disorders Clinic, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK. jason.warren@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Hearing deficits associated with cognitive impairment have attracted much recent interest, motivated by emerging evidence that impaired hearing is a risk factor for cognitive decline. However, dementia and hearing impairment present immense challenges in their own right, and their intersection in the auditory brain remains poorly understood and difficult to assess. Here, we outline a clinically oriented, symptom-based approach to the assessment of hearing in dementias, informed by recent progress in the clinical auditory neuroscience of these diseases. We consider the significance and interpretation of hearing loss and symptoms that point to a disorder of auditory cognition in patients with dementia. We identify key auditory characteristics of some important dementias and conclude with a bedside approach to assessing and managing auditory dysfunction in dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Auditory; Dementia; Frontotemporal dementia; Hearing; Lewy body disease; Progressive aphasia

PMID:
27372450
PMCID:
PMC5065893
DOI:
10.1007/s00415-016-8208-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Compliance with ethical standards Conflicts of interest The Dementia Research Centre is supported by Alzheimer’s Research UK, the Brain Research Trust and the Wolfson Foundation. CJDH holds an MRC PhD Studentship. CRM is funded by a Clinical Research Fellowship from the Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre. HLG was supported by an Alzheimer Research UK PhD Fellowship. CNC is supported by The National Brain Appeal—Frontotemporal Dementia Research Fund. JDW received salary support from the Wellcome Trust (Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellowship (091673/Z/10/Z). The authors report no conflicts of interest. Study funding This work was funded by the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council and the NIHR Queen Square Dementia Biomedical Research Unit.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center