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J Clin Virol. 2016 Aug;81:82-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2016.05.010. Epub 2016 May 24.

New findings in HCV genotype distribution in selected West European, Russian and Israeli regions.

Author information

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, Rostov State Medical University, 344022 Rostov on the Don, Russia.
2
Computational Biology and Applied Algorithmics, Max Planck Institute for Informatics, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany; Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany.
3
Liver Pathology Lab, Biochemistry and Microbiology Departments, University Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, CIBERehd, 08035 Barcelona, Spain.
4
Microbiology and Immunology Unit, Valladolid University Hospital, 47005 Valladolid, Spain.
5
Cologne-Bonn DZIF Partner Site, Institute of Virology, University of Cologne, 50935 Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: Rolf.kaiser@uk-koeln.de.
6
Cologne-Bonn DZIF Partner Site, Institute of Virology, University of Cologne, 50935 Cologne, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

HCV affects 185 million people worldwide and leads to death and morbidities. HCV has a high genetic diversity and is classified into seven genotypes and 67 subtypes. Novel anti-HCV drugs (Direct-Acting-Antivirals) eligibility, resistance and cure rates depend on HCV geno/subtype (GT).

OBJECTIVES:

Analysis of epidemiological information and viral GT from patients undergoing viral genotyping in 2011-2015.

STUDY DESIGN:

Anonymized information from 52 centers was analyzed retrospectively.

RESULTS:

37,839 samples were included in the study. We show that the GT distribution is similar throughout Western European countries, with some local differences. Here GTs 1 and 2 prevalences are lower and of GT4 higher than in all previous reports. Israel has a unique GT pattern and in South Russia the GT proportions are more similar to Asia. GTs 5 and 6 were detected in very low proportions. Three cases of the recombinant genotype P were reported in Munich (Germany). In addition, we observed that GT proportion was dependant on patientś gender, age and transmission route: GTs 1b and 2 were significantly more common in female, older, nosocomially-infected patients, while GTs 1a, 3 and 4 were more frequent in male, younger patients infected by tattooing, drug consume, and/or sexual practices. In infections acquired by drug consume, GTs 1a (35.0%) and 3 (28.1%) prevailed. In infections related to sexual practices lower proportion of GT3 (14.0%) and higher of GT4 (20.2%) were detected. GT4 was mostly abundant in MSM (29.6%). HIV coinfection was significantly associated with higher proportions GTs 1a and 4 (42.5% and 19.3%, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Genotype prevalence evolves and correlates to epidemiological factors. Continuous surveillance is necessary to better assess hepatitis C infection in Europe and to take appropriate actions.

KEYWORDS:

Genotype; HCV; Hepatitis C virus; Molecular epidemiology; Transmission

PMID:
27367545
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2016.05.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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