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Science. 2016 Jul 1;353(6294):67-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf5605.

A maleness gene in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

Author information

1
The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Pirbright, Surrey, GU24 0NF, UK.
2
Vector Biology Department, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK. Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK.
3
Vector Biology Department, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK.
4
The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Pirbright, Surrey, GU24 0NF, UK. Vector Biology Department, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK. jaroslaw.krzywinski@pirbright.ac.uk.

Abstract

The molecular pathways controlling gender are highly variable and have been identified in only a few nonmammalian model species. In many insects, maleness is conferred by a Y chromosome-linked M factor of unknown nature. We have isolated and characterized a gene, Yob, for the M factor in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Yob, activated at the beginning of zygotic transcription and expressed throughout a male's life, controls male-specific splicing of the doublesex gene. Silencing embryonic Yob expression is male-lethal, whereas ectopic embryonic delivery of Yob transcripts yields male-only broods. This female-killing property may be an invaluable tool for creation of conditional male-only transgenic Anopheles strains for malaria control programs.

PMID:
27365445
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf5605
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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