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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Jul 5;68(1):67-79. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.04.036.

The Genesis, Maturation, and Future of Critical Care Cardiology.

Author information

1
Divisions of Cardiology and Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: katzj@med.unc.edu.
2
Division of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
3
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Divisions of Cardiology and Critical Care, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
5
Division of Cardiology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
6
Division of Cardiology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Critical Care Medicine Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
7
Division of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina; Critical Care Medicine Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
8
Divisions of Cardiology and Critical Care, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

The cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) has changed considerably over time and now serves a unique patient population with a high burden of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular critical illness. Patient complexity and technological evolutions in the CICU have catalyzed the development of critical care cardiology, a fledgling discipline that combines specialization in cardiovascular diseases with knowledge and experience in critical care medicine. Numerous uncertainties and challenges threaten to stymie the growth of this field. A multidisciplinary dialogue focused on the best care design for the CICU patient is needed as we consider alternative approaches to clinical training, staffing, and investigation in this rapidly evolving arena.

KEYWORDS:

quality of care; research; training

PMID:
27364053
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2016.04.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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