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J Cell Physiol. 2017 Jan;232(1):69-77. doi: 10.1002/jcp.25475. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Multifaceted Breast Cancer: The Molecular Connection With Obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and General Pathology, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
2
IRCCS Malzoni Clinic, Avellino, Italy.
3
Department of Translational Medical Science, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
4
Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy.
5
Université de la Manouba, ISBST, BVBGR-LR11ES31, Biotechpole Sidi Thabet, 2020, Ariana, Tunisia.
6
Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
7
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
8
Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center for Biotechnology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
9
Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and General Pathology, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. marina.didomenico@unina2.it.
10
IRCCS Malzoni Clinic, Avellino, Italy. marina.didomenico@unina2.it.
11
Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center for Biotechnology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. marina.didomenico@unina2.it.

Abstract

Obesity is characterized by a disruption in energy balance regulation that results in an excess accumulation of body fat. Its increasing prevalence poses a major public health concern because it is a risk factor for a host of additional chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Obesity is increasingly recognized as a growing cause of cancer risk. In particular excessive adipose expansion during obesity causes adipose dysfunction and inflammation that can regulate tumor growth. In obesity, dysregulated systemic metabolism and inflammation induce hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and enhance sex hormone production with increased secretion of proinflammatory adipokine that impact breast cancer development and progression. This review describes how adipose inflammation that characterizes obesity is responsible of microenvironment to promote cancer, and discuss how steroid hormones, that are essential for the maintenance of the normal development, growth and differentiation of the cells, influence the induction and progression of breast cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 69-77, 2017.

PMID:
27363538
DOI:
10.1002/jcp.25475
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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