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Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(4):648-57. doi: 10.1017/S0007114516002555. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

High intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, affects serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomised trial.

Author information

1
1Department of Clinical Medicine,University of Bergen,Haukeland University Hospital,5021 Bergen,Norway.
2
2Broegelmann Research Laboratory,Department of Clinical Science,University of Bergen,Haukeland University Hospital,5021 Bergen,Norway.
3
3Skretting Aquaculture Research Centre AS,PO Box 48, 4001 Stavanger,Norway.
4
4Lerøy Seafood Group ASA,PO Box 7600,5020 Bergen,Norway.
5
5Department of Clinical Science,KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research,University of Bergen,Haukeland University Hospital,5021 Bergen,Norway.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine whether high intake of lean or fatty fish (cod and farmed salmon, respectively) by healthy, normal-weight adults would affect risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD when compared with lean meat (chicken). More knowledge is needed concerning the potential health effects of high fish intake (>300 g/week) in normal-weight adults. In this randomised clinical trial, thirty-eight young, healthy, normal-weight participants consumed 750 g/week of lean or fatty fish or lean meat (as control) for 4 weeks at dinner according to provided recipes to ensure similar ways of preparations and choices of side dishes between the groups. Energy and macronutrient intakes at baseline and end point were similar in all groups, and there were no changes in energy and macronutrient intakes within any of the groups during the course of the study. High intake of fatty fish, but not lean fish, significantly reduced TAG and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations in fasting serum when compared with lean meat intake. When compared with lean fish intake, fatty fish intake increased serum HDL-cholesterol. No differences were observed between lean fish, fatty fish and lean meat groups regarding fasting and postprandial glucose regulation. These findings suggest that high intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, could beneficially affect serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol, which are CVD risk factors, in healthy, normal-weight adults, when compared with high intake of lean meat.

KEYWORDS:

CML N ε -(carboxymethyl) lysine; CRP C-reactive protein; Chicken; Cod; Diets; Glucose; MG methylglyoxal; Salmon

PMID:
27363518
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114516002555
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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