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Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol. 2016 Oct 6;32:173-195. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

Cytoplasmic Streaming in the Drosophila Oocyte.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095; email: margot@chem.ucla.edu.

Abstract

Objects are commonly moved within the cell by either passive diffusion or active directed transport. A third possibility is advection, in which objects within the cytoplasm are moved with the flow of the cytoplasm. Bulk movement of the cytoplasm, or streaming, as required for advection, is more common in large cells than in small cells. For example, streaming is observed in elongated plant cells and the oocytes of several species. In the Drosophila oocyte, two stages of streaming are observed: relatively slow streaming during mid-oogenesis and streaming that is approximately ten times faster during late oogenesis. These flows are implicated in two processes: polarity establishment and mixing. In this review, I discuss the underlying mechanism of streaming, how slow and fast streaming are differentiated, and what we know about the physiological roles of the two types of streaming.

KEYWORDS:

RNA; actin; cell polarity; kinesin; microtubules

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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